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Hey, can I tell you something?

2018 September 26th

A well-communicated idea has the ability to change everything in its path.

Like a cognitive-powered atom bomb, it obliterates all concepts or ideas that have come before it, leaving only a new reality in its wake.

Put simply, ideas, are bar none, the most powerful force in the world, and have been since man developed the ability to communicate them.

We know this because history keeps a record of it. Every celebrated moment in history, every tragedy, started with an idea. And if you go back further, all the way to the very beginning of each idea, those moments in history most likely started with one person telling another person, something they’ve been thinking about.

Which is important to understand. Because if it is ideas that have the power to change the world, it is people that give them that power. But ideas are far from a perfect science. Countless great ideas have died in isolation, and the darkest moments in history have occurred when many followed a poor one into the abyss.

"Because if it is ideas that have the power to change the world, it is people that give them that power. "

If anything, how ideas are created, and how they are measured, is almost always the opposite of cold, hard science.

Science is objective, logical, fascinated with and wholly based on the raw compounds that make up each formula or equation.

Ideas, conversely, are emotional. Intuitive. Or rather, that’s how we understand and relate to them.

The information behind the idea, can be an undeniable, empirically and scientifically, such as Global Warming, for example. But whether we believe it most often comes down to how its communicated and whether we personally connect with the ‘how’ rather than the ‘what’.

The truth is that while an idea starts in the head, where it comes to life is in the heart.

A well-communicated idea understands intuitively that it’s not what it says, but how it says it. It understands that for people to get behind something, they first have to believe it. And for people to believe something, they first have to connect with it, emotionally and personally.

This matters now more than ever before because never has there been a time when ideas have been able to spread so freely. Technology and global connectivity makes this so. But as we’ve seen, technology doesn’t play favourites and bad ideas have all the same opportunities to spread as good ideas - and sadly, more than enough people willing them to do so.

"The truth is that while an idea starts in the head, where it comes to life is in the heart."

The questions this prompt is how do we build believers around the ideas that have potential to change the world for the better? And how do we help creators with good ideas communicate them in a way that will inspire others to get behind them?

In 2018, these are the kinds of questions we should be asking ourselves.

Here at Andpeople, we believe the Youth provide an answer to both of those questions.

Per capita, young people have more innovative, fresh and exciting ideas than any other population segment on the planet. It’s one of the perks of being young. They see the world through fresh eyes (or fresh sunglasses.).

It's an unquestionable track record. Mark Zuckerberg was 19 when he created Facebook, Steve Jobs was 21 when him and Steve Wozniak designed the first Apple computer, Nelson Mandela was 26 when he started South Africa’s long march to freedom. And these are just the tip of a deep iceberg of innovation. It’s safe to say that when young people look at the world, they usually see a better future.

And it's a track record that’s very likely to get better.

"Per capita, young people have more innovative, fresh and exciting ideas than any other population segment on the planet."

With the majority of the world (predominantly the 3rd World) getting younger, fast, there is a growing potential for fresh-thinking that has yet to exist before. This is given emphasis by necessity as young people today face global challenges that by definition require a fresh approach to solve them.

But as we know, its people, not ideas, that will make these changes possible.

Which brings us back to the youth. Because young people are not just natural creators, they’re also natural believers.

As a collective, they are emotionally charged. They feel, deeply. They are not afraid to trust their heart. Not afraid of much. They are bold. Uncompromising. You could call them idealists; but this wouldn’t reflect their perspective. They’re futurists. They see a better future.

As we’ve seen, if they believe in something, they’re capable of anything. From redefining how we understand gender, to overhauling incumbent, antiquated gun laws, to making tertiary education accessible to all. They’re a powerful force that is best mobilised through belief.

"The real question we should be asking ourselves then is how do we better empower young people?"

Empower them to create new, better ideas. Empower them to create believers.

This is an opportunity that exists for anyone in power or looking to engage this audience. Governments, organisations, corporates and institutions and from our perspective, most importantly brands.

Because if you can harness this force, you won’t just build a better brand, you may just change the world.

Written by
Michael Leslie